speaker-spotlight-emma-wynne

Speaker spotlight: Emma Wynne, Head of Growth Marketing at Pasta Evangelists

October 28, 2019
datasine

Our flagship marketing networking evening, #SuperchargeMarketing, lands in London on October 29th, as we bring together 100+ of the biggest innovators in the industry. Alongside loads of opportunities to mingle with your peers, we’ll also be opening the floor to a number of insightful thought-leaders working within the space.

Emma Wynne, Head of Growth Marketing at food box delivery service Pasta Evangelists, will be joining us to talk about growth marketing. We spoke with her ahead of the event to talk about personalising communications and her stint on a reality TV cooking show.  

Tell us a bit about yourself? 

Originally from Australia, I’m obsessed with food, sport and podcasts. I spent six years working as an advertising suit before seeing the light and moving into digital marketing, specifically working for startups. I helped grow the Urban List (Australia’s answer to Time Out) from a small startup to the top digital lifestyle publication in Australia. 

I then left to travel and write my own blog. I moved to London about a year and a half ago and most recently moved into the role of Head of Growth Marketing at Pasta Evangelists.

Emma-Wynne-Pasta-Evangelists

How did you get into marketing? 

After studying marketing at Uni, I won a scholarship for a year-long contract at Draft FBC advertising agency. After six years suiting, I actually left to go on a reality TV cooking show! Once that finished I somehow talked my way into a digital marketing job at the Urban List, who specialised in food and lifestyle content, growing their audience on organic social as well as pitching large scale content marketing campaigns to brands and media agencies. It was the perfect combination of my passions – marketing and communication, and food. We were literally delivered boxes of Nutella-filled doughnuts a freakshakes weekly.

“Podcasts are imperative for industry updates, self-education, but also idea generation.”

What marketing tools could you not live without? 

I’m a very goal-focussed person. Put a target in front of me and I’ll do anything I can to hit it. So, for that reason, analytics tools like Google Analytics and our boutique BI at Pasta Evangelists that shows us sales and retention metrics by channel is my first click every morning. As marketing and business owners become more sophisticated and CPAs rise it’s important to be able to not only have a great attribution model, but also be able to track that attribution beyond initial purchase.

Pixels from Google and Facebook in order to build lookalike audiences and re-target customers throughout the web.

Head-of-Growth-Emma-Wynne

“I’m a very goal-focussed person. Put a target in front of me and I’ll do anything I can to hit it.”

Programmes like Canva, Unbounce and iMovie that give you the ability to do so much without having to pay specialists. Especially important in lean startup land.

Wunderlist and Google Calendar from a project management point of view, you can have all the tools and ideas in the world, but if you can’t execute in a timely manner you’re not going to achieve anything.

This isn’t a tool per se, but podcast. I listen to a different marketing podcast every morning. They’re are imperative for industry updates, self-education, but also idea generation.


How do you see AI and machine learning affecting marketing? 

Obviously there is a little fear around AI taking marketing jobs. But I see it as an absolute positive. Machine learning taking on the more intricate roles like self-optimisation of campaigns, finding audiences online, personalisation of email campaigns and push notifications, leaves marketers open to doing what they do best: mixing creativity and science to develop new ideas and enter into new channels while AI works in the background to drive more efficient and effective campaigns in a shorter period of time.

“Asking yourself whether you would want your data used in this way is usually the best place to start.”

Do you have any tips for marketers can implement personalisation without coming across intrusive? 

Like many things in marketing, taking a step back and putting yourself in the consumer’s shoes is always the first step. Asking yourself whether you would want your data used in this way is usually the best place to start.

Speaker-spotlight-Emma

“Like many things in marketing, taking a step back and putting yourself in the consumer’s shoes is always the first step.”

My second piece of advice is to be completely up-to-date with legislation (GDPR, etc.) and continually considering it when dealing with customer data. Not following these legislations can have serious knock-on effects for yourself and the business you work for. 

In my previous role, I was working on a children’s education app based in the US. Apps collect infinitely more data about their users than the web and send it to all sorts of third parties. While I was there, Apple released an update to their guidelines that meant that kids apps could no longer use third-party software, in response to data concerns. This caused a ripple of panic throughout the kids’ app sector. For many brands, this update meant they would need to spend huge budgets building their own first-party software, stop selling on the Appstore, or shutdown. While Apple has now extended the deadline so it hasn’t been enforced yet, it demonstrated to me, just how seriously these platforms are taking personal data. Marketers need to play by the rules to avoid getting burnt.

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